Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/665
Title: Homonoia: When your Car Reads your Mind
Authors: Ahmad Bennakhi 
Supervisor: Prof. Maytham Safar
Keywords: Homonoia
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher:  Kuwait university - college of graduate studies
Abstract: This thesis is aimed towards studying, compiling, and analyzing the recent advances and risks of the current ambient technology that is present in modern day cars then come up with an innovative solution for a problem that is plaguing the industry with the widespread of technology. The progression of sophisticated technologies inside cars make them an even more comfortable and entertaining place to be in especially during commutes to work, but recent security threats and distractions have been uncovered with the upsurge usage of new technologies. This study also includes a survey that senses the people’s use of car technologies when driving. After we identify the problem and all of the previous attempts that tried to solve it, we shed light on the possibility of applying brain waves as a mean to understand the driver’s mood while on his/her everyday commutes. While there are several studies that document the relationship between brain waves and mood, none have progressed to apply it on vehicles. We experimented the use of EEG sensors to detect brain waves and recorded several correlations that could prove to be useful. After understanding the driver’s mood only through a passive approach, the car could suggest ways in which it could improve or compliment the driver’s mood. This could also open up a whole level of danger diversion features in cars, if both the car and the EEG sensor are integrated well enough.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/665
Appears in Programs:0612 Computer Engineering

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